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Hello, Bay Area. It’s Tuesday, July 19, and satellite data shows California’s forests are rapidly retreating. Here’s what you need to know to start your day.

Amid rising COVID cases and rising hospitalizations, it looks like Los Angeles County is heading toward a new indoor mask mandate. But the Bay Area is not yet ready to commit.

Bay Area county officials told The Chronicle they have no plans yet to reinstate mask-wearing in indoor public places and have not set any parameters or guidelines. timelines for when they might occur in the future.

“There’s not really a metric like in the good old days,” said UCSF infectious disease expert Dr. Peter Chin-Hong, referring to past surges when officials looked at positive test rates. , case rates and number of patients. “Other than a general feeling like in hospitals.”

State data shows positive test rates jumped to 16.7% on Friday, and there are likely many more positive home test results that are not being reported. Read more from Michael Cabanatuan.

From hot red to the step

Other signs show that the Bay Area housing market continues to cool. The latest report comes from the California Association of Realtors, which shows median home sales prices fell slightly in June compared to May.

Median sales prices for single-family homes fell last month in all nine Bay Area counties except Solano, according to association figures. Marin County saw the largest month-over-month decline in the Bay Area at 14%.

Monthly median prices fell 8% in Alameda, about 6% in San Francisco and Santa Clara and 5% in Contra Costa.

Learn more about Ricardo Cano.

More housing news:

• An Oakland waterfront housing site has sat vacant for years, but a new proposal for 100% affordable housing could kick-start construction.

• A San Francisco measure to streamline affordable housing projects pushed by progressives looks set to pass.

• The Next Battle in California’s Housing Crisis: Should Cities Tax Empty Homes?

what to eat

The King’s Platter is one of the options at Breakwater Barbecue in El Granada, Calif. on Friday, June 8, 2022.

Brian Feulner / Special for The Chronicle

Chronicle restaurant critics Soleil Ho and Cesar Hernandez have spent the past few months on a very important task: finding the best places to barbecue in the Bay Area. Their roster includes Fik’s Cue, a delivery-only operation that brings together Texas-style barbecue and Indonesian cuisine, and Pig in a Pickle at Corte Madera that features several regional styles.

Speaking of grilling, the cooking method is quite personal to Hernandez. When he moved to the Bay Area, he didn’t know of any carniceria. So he set out on a search and found the best places to buy pre-marinated carne asada for a home barbecue.

And in the world of fine dining, only one Bay Area restaurant made the World’s 50 Best Restaurants list this year, and it wasn’t Atelier Crenn or Benu who both made it last year. .

around the bay

The main lobby of Crocker Galleria sits empty along Sutter Street in the financial district of San Francisco, Calif., Friday, May 27, 2022.

The main lobby of Crocker Galleria sits empty along Sutter Street in the financial district of San Francisco, Calif., Friday, May 27, 2022.

Jessica Christian / The Chronicle

The future of downtown SF? A nonprofit business group has detailed a plan that includes street closures and outdoor gathering spaces to entice people back downtown.

No nonsense: On Monday, new SF school district leaders pledged to stay focused on student outcomes and have academic performance goals by October.

A worrying future: California is losing its trees at an alarming rate, with trees in mountainous regions of the state declining by 6.7% between 1985 and 2021.

A long wait: Residents displaced by flooding in an SF tower could wait until next year to return home.

A multi-million dollar settlement: Uber is settling a federal lawsuit claiming it unfairly charged people with disabilities.

Shark attack survivor: California wildlife officials estimate the size of a great white shark that attacked a man in Monterey Bay in late June. Also: Here’s what experts believe killed a juvenile humpback whale that washed up on a Bay Area beach.

Monkeypox outbreak: On Monday, several SF LGBTQ advocacy organizations criticized the federal government for its anemic response to the growing monkeypox epidemic.

Learn to adapt

Golfer Erik Bowen, 42, practices his swing at Berkeley Country Club Friday, July 1, 2022, in El Cerrito, Calif.  Bowen is a double amputee who qualified for the inaugural US Adaptive Open, an international tournament for golfers with disabilities July 18-20 in Pinehurst, North Carolina.  Bowen works in finance in San Francisco and lost both feet to a staph infection.

Golfer Erik Bowen, 42, practices his swing at Berkeley Country Club Friday, July 1, 2022, in El Cerrito, Calif. Bowen is a double amputee who qualified for the inaugural US Adaptive Open, an international tournament for golfers with disabilities July 18-20 in Pinehurst, North Carolina. Bowen works in finance in San Francisco and lost both feet to a staph infection.

Yalonda M. James / ONLINE_YES

Erik Bowen, 42, of Oakland, played several sports growing up, but he particularly enjoyed golf and it became a serious hobby.

But in December 2013, strep throat and pneumonia sent him into septic shock. At one point, a doctor said he had only a 30% chance of surviving, writes journalist Ron Kroichick. His wife, Jodie, said they were “in disbelief” and called the ordeal “incredibly scary”.

At the same time, Jodie endured a serious health ordeal and Erik eventually had to have both of his feet amputated. While things were bleak for a while, Erik finally learned to play golf on his prosthetics again.

Now he’s in North Carolina to compete in the inaugural US Adaptive Open. Read Bowen’s poignant story here.

Bay Briefing is written by Kellie Hwang and Anna Buchmann and sent to readers’ inboxes weekday mornings. Sign up for the newsletter here and contact the writers at [email protected] and [email protected]